Sisters steal baby boy to stop father from remarrying

Police arrested two sisters from Uttar Pradesh’s Mathura district on Monday for allegedly stealing a newborn from a government hospital in Rajasthan’s Bharatpur, but they left the baby on a roadside with a note and a feeding bottle three days later.

The suspects, identified as Shivani Devi and Priyanka Devi, aged 23 and 20, said before officers they wanted to gift a baby boy to their mother who was suffering from depression as their father was planning to remarry after their 12-year-old brother died two years ago.

The women stole the baby on January 10, but were overcome by fear after reading in newspapers about police trying to catch the culprits. They abandoned the boy on January 13 near Rarah village with a handwritten appeal that whoever found him should inform police that this is the baby stolen on January 10.

Bharatpur superintendent of police Anil Kumar Tank said investigators identified the siblings through CCTV camera footage from the hospital. The two women were seen in the video riding a scooter, while a man at the bicycle and motorbike parking lot of the hospital remembered the vehicle’s registration number.

We arrested the sisters from their native village, Swarupa Naugaon, in Mathura under Section 363 (kidnapping) of the IPC and charged them with stealing a baby,” the district police chief said.

The women allegedly did a recce in Bharatpur and targeted the son of 30-year-old Manish, whose wife had delivered the baby around 4am on January 10 at a community health centre in nearby Pahari town and was shifted to the government women’s hospital under Mathura Gate police station for better care. They took away the boy around 2. 30pm when the mother was sleeping. But the hospital surveillance video revealed the culprits and Manish’s father-in-law, Saddique Mev, registered a complaint.

Police superintendent Tank said the two women told police that they initially tried to adopt a boy to stop father Laxman Singh from taking another wife for a son, underscoring a largely patriarchal society’s obsession with a male heir.

Also, they approached nurses in hospitals to know if they could buy a baby from a poor family. But the sisters gave up because of the long legal process for adoption, and strict laws and punishment against any distress sale of babies.

Shivani is a teacher at a private school, married and lives with her husband at Pali Kheda in Mathura. Priyanka is married too, lives in Agra and studying for her graduation in arts.

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This wallaby halted traffic by hopping across the Sydney Harbor Bridge

  • Published in World

A wallaby is seen amid vegetation on Sept. 7, 2011. SYDNEY) — A wayward wallaby disrupted downtown traffic by bounding across the Sydney Harbor Bridge on Tuesday with police in pursuit.

The adult male was captured without any apparent serious injury and is expected to be released back into the wild within days.

Swamp wallabies, which are smaller marsupials than their kangaroo cousins, are common across eastern Australia, but are rarely seen in cities.

The startled wallaby hopped across the bridge’s eight lanes of traffic an hour before sunrise then turned onto an expressway on the harbor’s southern shore toward the Sydney Opera House. pursuing police car with flashing lights videoed the animal’s steady bounding before a police officer captured him near the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and wrangled him into a horse float, police said.

Veterinarian Larry Vogelnest said the wallaby was “quite distressed” but he gave it a tranquilizer before taking it to the wildlife hospital at nearby Taronga Zoo.

It had some minor grazes on its face and its hind legs,” Vogelnest told reporters. There don’t seem to be any major injuries.

Vogel said he did not know where the wallaby had come from or how it found its way to the bridge.

It’s unusual obviously to have a wallaby running around on the Harbor Bridge, but there are more and more of these wallabies turning up in bush land close to the city,” Vogelnest said.

A motorist who identified himself as Ray told Sydney Radio 2GB of his surprise at seeing police cars with flashing lights pursuing a wallaby.

I’m from the bush, I’m used to seeing them running all over the place, but I’ve never seen one so close in the city before,” Ray said.

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