Sisters steal baby boy to stop father from remarrying

Police arrested two sisters from Uttar Pradesh’s Mathura district on Monday for allegedly stealing a newborn from a government hospital in Rajasthan’s Bharatpur, but they left the baby on a roadside with a note and a feeding bottle three days later.

The suspects, identified as Shivani Devi and Priyanka Devi, aged 23 and 20, said before officers they wanted to gift a baby boy to their mother who was suffering from depression as their father was planning to remarry after their 12-year-old brother died two years ago.

The women stole the baby on January 10, but were overcome by fear after reading in newspapers about police trying to catch the culprits. They abandoned the boy on January 13 near Rarah village with a handwritten appeal that whoever found him should inform police that this is the baby stolen on January 10.

Bharatpur superintendent of police Anil Kumar Tank said investigators identified the siblings through CCTV camera footage from the hospital. The two women were seen in the video riding a scooter, while a man at the bicycle and motorbike parking lot of the hospital remembered the vehicle’s registration number.

We arrested the sisters from their native village, Swarupa Naugaon, in Mathura under Section 363 (kidnapping) of the IPC and charged them with stealing a baby,” the district police chief said.

The women allegedly did a recce in Bharatpur and targeted the son of 30-year-old Manish, whose wife had delivered the baby around 4am on January 10 at a community health centre in nearby Pahari town and was shifted to the government women’s hospital under Mathura Gate police station for better care. They took away the boy around 2. 30pm when the mother was sleeping. But the hospital surveillance video revealed the culprits and Manish’s father-in-law, Saddique Mev, registered a complaint.

Police superintendent Tank said the two women told police that they initially tried to adopt a boy to stop father Laxman Singh from taking another wife for a son, underscoring a largely patriarchal society’s obsession with a male heir.

Also, they approached nurses in hospitals to know if they could buy a baby from a poor family. But the sisters gave up because of the long legal process for adoption, and strict laws and punishment against any distress sale of babies.

Shivani is a teacher at a private school, married and lives with her husband at Pali Kheda in Mathura. Priyanka is married too, lives in Agra and studying for her graduation in arts.

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AngelList launches Syndicates in India

AngelList launches Syndicates in India

AngelList has expanded its syndicates program to India in the latest overseas move for the US crowdfunding platform.

The launch comes some 18 months after we reported that AngelList had hired Utsav Somani to launch the service and develop its business generally in India, where it also offers its hiring product.

Syndicates was launched in the US in

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Extremely rare 'firework' jelly fish spotted near Mexico

  • Published in World

During a recent sea expedition near Mexico, researchers spotted a rare jellyfish off the Socorro Island, Mexico. The Halitrephes Maasi jellyfish is extremely rare and is one of a dozen to have been ever seen. This jellyfish looks like a 'firework' from is appearance.

Researchers onboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus — a research vessel operated by the Ocean Exploration Trust — captured stunning photographs of this rare species, the Telegraph reported.

The Halitrephes Maasi jellyfish is a species of deep-sea jellyfish belonging to the family Halicreatidae. They are usually spotted at a depth of 4,000 to 5,000 feet under the water. However, this rare sighting of the jellyfish was barely at a depth of almost a mile — 1609 m — which in itself is a rare phenomenon.

The team of researchers at the exploration trust wrote that they started this year with deep sea fireworks stating that whenever they witness anything remarkable floating in the sea during their expeditions, they quickly document the discovery.

Speaking of the rare jellyfish, the team said that the frilled tentacles of the Halitrephes Maasi were discovered in the Revillagigedo Archipelago off the Mexican state of Baja California. The researchers said that the “radial canals that move nutrients through the jelly's bell form a starburst pattern that reflects the lights of ROV Hercules with bright splashes of yellow and pink.

They also shared a video of the rare species on their website.

The Ocean Exploration Trust was started by Dr. Robert Ballard in the year 2008. Dr. Ballard is infamous for discovering the wreckage of the Titanic.

Twitter users couldn’t control their excitement on learning about the extremely rare ‘firework’ jellyfish.

It’s amazing to have such spectacular color on a jellyfish, so far below the ocean, very cool,” a user named Thomas Otterman wrote on Twitter.

Beautiful! The incredible world beneath the ocean that humans have yet to explore-amazing isn't it? wrote Amrapali Choudhary.

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Chinese 'rainbow dinosaur' had iridescent feathers

  • Published in World

There's not a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. There's an iridescent dinosaur.

Scientists on Monday announced the discovery of a crow-sized, bird-like dinosaur with colorful feathers from northeastern China that lived 161 million years ago during the Jurassic Period.

They named it Caihong, the Mandarin word for rainbow. Microscopic structures in the exquisitely preserved, nearly complete fossil unearthed in Hebei Province indicated that it boasted iridescent feathers, particularly on its head, neck and chest, with colors that shimmered and shifted in the light, like those of hummingbirds.

The discovery "suggests a more colorful Jurassic World than we previously imagined," said evolutionary biologist Chad Eliason of the Field Museum in Chicago, one of the researchers in the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

Using powerful microscopes, the scientists detected within the feathers the remnants of organelles called melanosomes responsible for pigmentation. Their shape determines the color. Caihong's feathers had pancake-shaped melanosomes similar to those of hummingbirds with iridescent feathers.

Much of its body had dark feathers, but ribbon-like iridescent feathers covered its head and neck. While it possessed many bird-like characteristics, the researchers doubted it could actually get airborne. Its plumage could have attracted mates while also providing insulation.

Caihong was a two-legged predator with a Velociraptor-like skull and sharp teeth, probably hunting small mammals and lizards. It had crests above its eyes that looked like bony eyebrows.

Many dinosaurs possessed feathers. Birds evolved from small feathered dinosaurs near the end of the Jurassic Period. Caihong had fuzzy feathers and pennaceous ones, those that look like writing quills. It is the earliest-known creature with asymmetrical feathers, a trait used by birds to steer when flying. Caihong's were on its tail, suggesting tail feathers, not arm feathers, were first utilized for aerodynamic locomotion.

It is extremely similar to some early birds such as Archaeopteryx," said paleontologist Xing Xu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, referring to the earliest-known bird, which lived 150 million years ago. Its forelimbs were configured like wings. To be honest, I am not sure what function the feathers have, and I don't think that you can completely exclude the possibility that the feathers helped the animal to get in the air.

Asked what someone might say upon seeing Caihong, University of Texas paleontologist Julia Clarke said, "'Wow! And if they are anything like me, they might want one as a pet. Not suitable for children.

The dinosaur's full scientific name, Caihong juji, means "rainbow with a big crest.

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